glengoyne whisky email RobbieHughesI have read a few times that Glengoyne the slowest distilled single malt is, now you send me you newsletter and I read it again.
My question to you, is it possible that you tell me about that slow distilling, I have try to find it on internet but nothing.

My thanks are very great, also for your time......

Ronald Bijl,  is one of Netherland's whisky experts and an authority on the subject. By the years he collected lots of information in his database concerning al the aspects of whisky.

From the private email letters of Ronald he wrote may times to many Distillery Managers to ask all our questions about whisky making...


Many thanks for letting us share this worthful information, Slainthe Mhath Team BestofWhisky.com

Goodday Ladies and Gentlemen,

I hope everything is well.
I have read a few times that Glengoyne the slowest distilled single malt is, now you send me you newsletter and I read it again.
My question to you, is it possible that you tell me about that slow distilling, I have try to find it on internet but nothing.
My thanks are very great, also for your time.
With compliments.

Ronald Bijl


Hello Ronald,            
            
Thank you very much for your enquiry of our slow distillation at Glengoyne Distillery, this is a big question that you asked.             
I will do my best to explain.            
            
After the cask the second greatest influence on the flavour of the whisky is the distillation.             
The distillation is the last point in the distillery process where we can leave our mark on the final product, when we can produce something that is different from other whisky distilleries.            

When we charge the Stills with the fermented Wash (first distillation) and Low wines and Feints (second distillation) we bring both sets of Stills to the boil very slowly, eventually the alcohol             
boils and turns to vapour and rises up the Still.             

There are also flavour compounds rising with the alcohol trying to reach the neck of the Still and to get cooled down into a liquid again in the condenser to eventually become Glengoyne Whisky.            
Not all of these flavour compounds are needed at Glengoyne, some of the heavier flavours/compounds must be removed before the condenser.            

We do this by operating the Stills at a very slow rate of distillation, we have this down to a fine art, we have been doing it like this for many, many decades.             
If we were to speed up our distillation by adding more steam to the Stills we would encourage the heavier flavours to rise up the neck of the Still to the condenser where they             

My question to you, is it possible that you tell me about that slow distilling, I have try to find it on internet but nothing.            
These heavier flavours may be beneficial for other distilleries but they aren't what we are looking for here, they would change our flavour profile.             
Another important factor in distillation is the effect of copper on the flavour of the spirit and also how it removes some unwanted elements from the fermentation, sulphur is a good example of  an unwanted flavour at Glengoyne.            

To produce Glengoyne Whisky we need maximum contact with the copper during the distillation process.             
Our Stills have a Boiling Ball on their shoulder (you will see this on a photograph of the Still House) this is to get as much copper contact as possible with the rising vapour.            

The rising vapour has some unwanted elements (sulphur) removed from it as it comes into contact with the copper and it also strips some of the copper from the Still. This adds to the complexity of the final distillate, eventually after a number of years we will need to replace the Still because it gets very thin.             

Slow distillation allows the copper contact at Glengoyne to be maximised, ensuring we get the finest quality "New make" spirit we possibly can.            
            
I hope this answers your question Ronald, happy drinking.             
            
Regards            
         
Robbie Hughes        
Distillery Manager Glengoyne

Source: From the private email letters of Ronald Bijl, he is one of Netherland's whisky experts and an authority on the subject. By the years he collected lots of information in his database concerning al the aspects of whisky.

Many thanks for letting us share this worthful information,

Slainthe Mhath Team BestofWhisky.com

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